Local News

Commentary: FASD program, class to aid caregivers

SITKA, ALASKA
This is Christy Williams with comments on some Sitka events occurring the first week in January, 2011. Deb Evensen, an expert on supporting those who experience the effects of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders will make several presentations. She will present in a Community Program on Thursday, January 6th at Harrigan Centennial Hall from 7-9 PM.

For anyone interested in one college credit on various techniques that have worked in supporting students and families living with the effects of FASD, Ed. 593 is being offered at the Sitka UAS campus. The information discussed in this course will enable us to support neighbors, friends, co-workers, and employees who may be experiencing Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. I am thrilled with this opportunity and have registered for Ed. 593. The cost is simply $90 for fourteen hours with Deb. She has taught at the university level for nine years.

Deb has been supporting and training Alaskan students experiencing FASD, their families, and care providers since 1989. I attended a workshop she offered fourteen years ago at the Early Childhood Conference in Juneau. I find her to be a comfortable, positive presenter. She is easy to listen to and will take time to answer individual questions and to brainstorm solutions. The Community Program on January 6th will feature three presenters and is open to all Sitkans.

This is Christy Williams, grateful to Raven Radio for being allowed to share my excitement about events occurring the first week of January in Sitka.
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