Local News

Homeowner: Solar panels a worthwhile experiment

Contractor Jamal Floate prepares the roof for installation of the solar panels, on an autumn day in 2010. (Photo: Ed Ronco)

Sitka | One year ago, Michelle Putz and her husband Perry Edwards installed six solar panels on their roof in an attempt to generate electricity. It was a $12,000 investment that Putz says has performed “about as well as expected” in the sun-starved rainforest of Southeast Alaska.

In the last year, they’ve generated 936 kilowatt hours of electricity. On the best day in the summer, the panels produced about 9 kWh. On the best day in the winter, about 1.6. You can view live data from the Putz/Edwards household here.

But even if they haven’t been prolific or profitable, Putz says having the panels has still been worthwhile.

She spoke to KCAW’s Ed Ronco on Monday afternoon. Click below to hear the full interview.

Putz’s husband, Perry Edwards, is on the Raven Radio board of directors. He joined the board after the solar project was underway.

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