Local News

UPDATE: 3 file to run for Sitka mayor

With four days left before the deadline, three people have shown interest in being the next mayor of Sitka.

Cheryl Westover will seek a second term in the office. She’s facing a challenge from Assembly members Mim McConnell and Thor Christianson.

McConnell has been on the Assembly since 2009. Her term expires this year. Christianson was elected to the Assembly in 2010, so he has one year remaining in his term.

Westover first joined the Assembly in 2006. She was elected mayor in 2010. She won by two votes over John Stein.

In addition to the mayoral candidates, the fall ballot also includes Michelle Putz and Matthew Hunter. They have filed to run for Assembly. Additionally, Cass Pook is seeking re-election to the school board.

Those interested in running for office must pick up a packet from the municipal clerk’s office in city hall.

Municipal Clerk Colleen Ingman’s office says a number of candidate packets are still in circulation. They must be returned by 5 p.m. Friday.

The municipal election is Oct. 2.


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