Southeast News

Recalled Wrangell hospital board members want suit dropped

Six recalled Wrangell hospital board members are asking a judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed against them by the borough’s government.

They’re also asking the court to require Wrangell to pay all expenses and legal fees.

Attorneys for the members listed those terms in an August 10th response to the municipality’s lawsuit, which was filed in July.

The suit stems from the six board members’ decision to terminate the Wrangell Medical Center’s CEO. It alleges those members improperly gave Noel Selle-Rea a million-dollar-plus severance package. About half of that amount was wired to him shortly after the vote to end his contract.

The votes took place during the board’s final meeting after a June recall election. The municipality says the action violated terms of Selle-Rea’s  contract and amounted to a personal gift.

The latest court filing by the board members contests those claims.

Eight hospital board members were recalled, but the suit only names the six who attended the meeting and voted for the severance package. The only member who wasn’t recalled was at the meeting, but voted against both.

Attorneys for the six could not be reached for immediate comment. The municipality’s attorney declined comment.

Meanwhile, 17 people have filed to replace the recalled members in an August 21st special election.

Click here to read our July report on the municipality’s lawsuit.

Click here to read the recalled board members’ response to the lawsuit.

Click here to read the original lawsuit.

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