Local News

Sitka program puts student art on display

All summer long, four student apprentices have been working on Alaska Native artwork at the Sitka National Historical Park. The students studied under metal carver Charlie Skultka. The Alaska Geographic Society supplied enough money to provide supplies and a $10 per hour stipend for the students.

Click below to meet Skultka and two of the student artists, 16-year-olds Jenny Jeter and Tommy Svilar. You can see pictures here, too, or check them out at the park. Their work will be on display through September.

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Jenny Jeter stands with her artwork at Sitka National Historical Park on Friday. Jeter, 16, is one of four students to apprentice under metal carver Charlie Skultka this summer. (KCAW photo/Ed Ronco)

A pair of earrings carved by 16-year-old Jenny Jeter, hanging on a basket she wove. Jeter is seen in the reflection. (KCAW photo/Ed Ronco)

Tommy Svilar, 16, stands in front of a display case showing his work at Sitka National Historical Park. (KCAW photo/Ed Ronco)

These earrings were carved by Svilar.  (KCAW photo/Ed Ronco)

Svilar included this piece to show his process. On the left, the silver is unpolished, and the design is barely scratched into the metal. On the right side, the carving is more thorough and the metal shines. (KCAW photo/Ed Ronco)

 

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