Election Coverage

Miss any results? We’ve got you covered

Democrat Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins (left) and Republican state Rep. Bill Thomas (right) are separated by only 44 votes in the race for House District 34. (Photos provided)

Updated: 11:52 a.m., 11/9/12

CoastAlaska’s Ed Schoenfeld and Gavel Alaska’s Jeremy Hsieh maintained a live blog on election night. It’s worth checking out, especially if you went to bed early.

Now, closer to home, there are a few contests you should know about. Most of the KCAW listening area falls into House District 34. And that race is close.

State Rep. Bill Thomas (R-Haines) trails Jonathan Kreiss-Tomkins (D-Sitka) by just 43 votes.

Kreiss-Tomkins: 3,116 (50.26%)
Thomas: 3,073 (49.56%)
All precincts reporting

Absentee ballots, along with questioned ballots, still need to be counted. So House District 34 is still anyone’s race.

In House District 32, which serves Tenakee Springs, Democratic state Rep. Beth Kerttula was unopposed for re-eelection.

On the Senate side, things are more decisive. State Sen. Bert Stedman (R-Sitka) has won re-election over fellow Sen. Albert Kookesh (D-Angoon).

Stedman: 7,189 (64.00%)
Kookesh: 4,016 (35.75%)
All precincts reporting

For Senate District R, which includes Yakutat, Republican state Sen. Gary Stevens beat Democratic challenger Robert Henrichs. Stevens had 71 percent of the vote, to Henrichs’ 29 percent.

Tenakee Springs is the only community in the KCAW listening area not covered by the above results. It had no senate race this year, and state Rep. Beth Kerttula (D-Juneau) ran unopposed.

It was a mixed result for ballot questions before voters statewide. Alaskans appear to have rejected a constitutional convention and approved bonds for transportation projects.

Farther afield
Want to know what’s going on across the rest of the state? Turn to the Alaska Public Radio Network.

If you’re looking for information on the presidential election or any of the various Congressional contests last night, NPR News has details.

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