SoundCheck

Raven’s ‘SoundCheck’ debuts on Friday

Raven Radio is developing a new public affairs program — our first in several years! SoundCheck is about issues, ideas, and people in and around Sitka. The show will combine the best aspects of on-air journalism (tough issues, thoughtful conversation) packaged in a podcast format for mobile listeners.

We’ll give SoundCheck a trial run Friday, November 30, at 8:30 AM. To make it happen, we’ll adjust our morning lineup slightly. Between 8 AM and 8:30 we’ll have NPR headlines as usual, Alaska Morning News will not be heard (catch state headlines at 7:06 AM, or at alaskapublic.org), and Marketplace, the Morning Interview, and the Writers Almanac will all be on a few minutes earlier than usual. Local news will air at its usual time at 8:49.

On SoundCheck this week:

The life and times of basketball legend Herb Didrickson

Herb Didrickson is a lifelong Sitka resident, regarded by many as one of the greatest basketball players ever produced in Alaska. He played for Sheldon Jackson High School during the World War II years in the mid-1940s, against teams from the Army and Navy comprised of some of the best college players of the era. His friend, Gil Truitt, has nominated Didrickson for the Alaska Sports Hall of Fame – for the third time. Truitt, and former Division I player and veteran college coach John Abell make the case for Didrickson’s selection. Hosted by KCAW’s Robert Woolsey

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