Deserted Island Archive

Reggae Italian style

PR5Pablo Raster’s deserted island is a very groovy place. He has been immersed in reggae music since he first saw Reggae National Tickets perform live in Venice, Italy when he was nineteen years old. He has learned guitar, bass, singing, writing and producing reggae, dub and dub step and growing four feet dreadlocks in the process. Pablo is the songwriter and  vocalist for Raster, a dub band based in Spoleto, Italy, with six albums and more than 700 performances to their credit. He selected ten songs that he would choose to have on a deserted island, plus one dessert. Here are the songs, the dessert and a recording of the program.

Reggae National Tickets – Suono
Almamegretta – Figli di annibale
Linton Kwesi Johnson – Sonny’s Lettah
Israel Vibration – Cool and Calm
Africa Unite – Ruggine
Mau Mau – Due Cuori
Madaski – Tonight
Delta V – Un’estate fa
Zion Train – Baby Father
Zomboy – Nuclear (Hands up)

Pablo’s dessert of choice is Tiramisu, an Italian favorite, click on the photo for the recipe.

Tiramisu II Recipe


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