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Local news returns to 6:49 & 7:49 AM

NPR_Morning_EditionYou spoke, we listened!

After a month-long test of our new morning lineup, we’ve taken your feedback and created what we hope combines KCAW’s tradition of providing the best local, state, and national news available, with the predictability you’ve come to rely on from your community station.

While there’s much to like about where we’re headed with the morning schedule, many of us were happier with Local News at its original times at 6:49 and 7:49.

Check out our revised Morning Edition rundown beginning Monday, September 30, 2013:

Morning Edition, 6-8:30 AM
Local hosts Peter Apathy, Ken Fate, Emily Reilly, Melissa Marconi-Wentzel.
5:59 Sign on, local weather
6:00 NPR Headline News
6:06 Raven Billboard (Local/regional news preview, Morning Interview preview,
important events today, Raven programming today.)
6:10 NPR Morning Edition
6:19 Things Happening
6:21 NPR Morning Edition
6:36 Marine Weather, sunrise/sunset, tide table
6:40 NPR Morning Edition
6:49 Local News I

7:01 NPR Headline News
7:06 Alaska Morning News
7:10 NPR Morning Edition
7:19 Things Happening
7:21 NPR Morning Edition
7:36 Zone weather, lunch menus, cruise calendar
7:40 NPR Morning Edition
7:49 Local News II

8:01 NPR Headline News
8:06 Alaska Morning News
8:10 Marketplace
8:18 The Morning Interview
8:25 Writers’ Almanac

8:30-9:30 The Good Day Radio Show


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