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In water, forest, and lab Stanford ‘SoCo’ examines Alaska’s natural systems

The 2013 Stanford SoCo poses after a morning's work in the Starrigavan Valley. (Caitlin Woolsey photo)

The 2013 Stanford SoCo poses after a morning’s work in the Starrigavan Valley. (Caitlin Woolsey photo)

Twelve sophomores from Stanford University are in Sitka this month for a 3-week field course studying human and natural systems in Southeast Alaska. The course is taught by a combination of four graduate instructors, visiting Stanford professors, and local experts. It’s called a “SoCo” — or Sophomore College — and it’s one of several Stanford SoCo’s taking place around the country.

KCAW’s Caitlin Woolsey is a Stanford senior, and the SoCo teaching assistant. She sent this audio postcard from what is proving to be a hands-on adventure in higher education.


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Anna Wietelemann, Zach Brown, and Scott Harris check pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen levels in Indian River during a fisheries field exercise. (Caitlin Woolsey photo)

Anna Wietelemann, Zach Brown, and Scott Harris check pH, temperature, and dissolved oxygen levels in Indian River during a fisheries field exercise. (Caitlin Woolsey photo)

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