The CorvidEYE

Arts and crafts

Participants in Sitka’s 6th annual Wearable Arts show flaunted their homemade haute couture before before a sold-out crowd at Harrigan Centennial Hall on Saturday night (3-1-2014). The show was put on by the Greater Sitka Arts Council, as part of the Arti-Gras Arts and Music Festival.

Featured in the slideshow above: Emily Reilly modeled “Queen of the Galaxy,” made by Jean Bartos of Ketchikan. “The Journey Home,”  designed by Angela McGraw, was inspired by a meeting with Roma women on a subway in Rome.  Fiona Digeatano, age 3, wore a dress created by Casey Orona from used plastic bags. Melody Kingsley modeled “Air-able Art,” designed by Jeff Budd, Liz Schababerle, and Cheryl Vastola. Christi Henthorn, Paula Langdorf, Blossom Twitchell, Renae Hill, Kate Petraborg, Lois Denherder, Ember Livingston and Karlie Smith created and modeled “The Denim Dolls.” Woods Hill bounced down the runway to the tune of “I’m A Gummy Bear” in an outfit that his mother, Angie Hill, constructed from his preschool art projects. Emmie Fish made her chain mail, in “The Metal Soldier,”  from more than 4,000 soda can pull-tabs. Sonya Linden modeled a quilted denim outfit made by Sabra Jenkins. And Kate Frederic modeled the aptly named “Dancing in Fire” by artist Tori Carl.

Photos by Rachel Waldholz, KCAW.

UPDATED 3/4/14: An earlier version of this post misstated the artist who made the dress worn by Fiona Digeatano. The artist is Casey Orona, not Elsa Hernandez. 

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