Local News

Man charged following bear death on Granite Creek

A Sitka man has been charged with Unlawful Possession of Game, following the shooting of a bear in the Granite Creek neighborhood last week.

25-year-old Aaron Didrickson was cited by state Fish & Wildlife Troopers for allegedly retaining some of the meat of the bear, which he claimed he shot in self-defense.

According to troopers, Didrickson was called by a friend who lives in the Granite Creek neighborhood to help with a bear near the property.

Didrickson told troopers who responded to the shooting that the bear presented an immediate threat to his safety.

Alaska Wildlife Trooper Tim Hall investigated Didrickson’s claim, and agreed that it was a lawful shooting in Defense of Life or Property, or DLP.

“The bear was very close to him and he was armed to deal with that and he did,” said Hall.

Didrickson would have been off the hook had he followed DLP guidelines. Under the DLP statute you have to surrender different parts of the animal. Didrickson turned in the skull and hide with claws attached to State Troopers. But, it was later discovered that Didrickson kept a portion of the meat, which is not legal because the bear belongs to the state.

“There were some postings made on the Sitka Bear Report Facebook Page suggesting that he had kept bear meat to make jerky out of,” said Hall.

Didrickson forfeited the meat to Troopers. He will be arraigned in Sitka Court on June 3rd.

Comments

Please read our comment guidelines.

Recent News

Botanists look to fern for clues to Southeast’s past

Brad Krieckhaus, botanist at the Sitka Ranger District, made the first modern find of the fern on the southwest side of Baranof Island in Summer 2005.
A species of fern common in Asia has been found in Southeast Alaska. But unlike invasive species, Wright’s filmy fern is an early colonizer. And figuring out how and when it got here is the next piece of the puzzle. more

Rob Harcourt: Where the wild things swim

Rob_Harcourt
Rob Harcourt is a professor of Marine Ecology at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia. He's in Sitka as a Scientist in Residency Fellow (SIRF) at the Sitka Sound Science Center. Harcourt uses advanced tagging techniques to study ocean animals and their habitat -- everything from jellyfish to blue whales. He'll be speaking tonight (6PM Wed Apr 22, Alaska Raptor Rehabilitation Center, free) on climate change and penquins: "Will Happy Feet feel the heat?" With SSS research director Tory O'Connell. Downloadable audio. more