Local News

No SE tsunami danger from Aleutians quake

A map from the National Tsunami Warning Center shows the location of Monday's 8.0 magnitude earthquake in the Western Aleutians, indicated by the house. (Map courtesy of NTWC)

A map from the National Tsunami Warning Center shows the location of Monday’s 8.0 magnitude earthquake in the Western Aleutians, indicated by the house. (Map courtesy of NTWC)

A large earthquake in the Aleutians today (Monday 6-23-14) posed no tsunami danger to Southeast Alaska, according to the National Tsunami Warning Center.

The magnitude 8.0 earthquake struck the Aleutians just before 1 p.m. today. It was centered about 25 miles northwest of Amchitka, at the western end of the Aleutian chain. The initial quake was followed by several aftershocks.

The earthquake prompted a tsunami warning for parts of the Aleutian chain, which was later downgraded to an advisory and then cancelled.

A small tsunami wave, of about 7 inches, was recorded in Amchitka around 3:20 p.m. Dutch Harbor recorded a wave of less than 4 inches about ten minutes later.

The Tsunami Warning Center said the depth of the earthquake limited the extent of tsunami danger. The center estimated that the quake took place at a depth of about 68 miles.

You can find more coverage of the earthquake from APRN member station KUCB in Unalaska here.

 

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