The CorvidEYE

Music on the house

Sitka Summer Music Festival artistic director Zuill Bailey explains some musical backstories at Sunday's final concert. (KCAW photo/Greta Mart)

Sitka Summer Music Festival artistic director Zuill Bailey explains some musical backstories at Sunday’s final concert. (KCAW photo/Greta Mart)

Sunday marked the final public concert of the 43rd annual Sitka Summer Music Festival, titled “Brunch with Schubert.” Barbara Hames hosted the event at her Halibut Point Road home, and a sold-out crowd enjoyed a full concert and post-concert brunch buffet of crab cakes, moose sliders and cream-and-berry-stuffed french toast.

Guests line up for a brunch buffet. (KCAW photo/Greta Mart)

Guests line up for a brunch buffet. (KCAW photo/Greta Mart)

SSMF artistic director and cellist Zuill Bailey and pianist Natasha Paremski performed Stravinsky’s Suite Italienne for Cello and Piano, while the Cypress String Quartet (Cecily Ward, Tom Stone, Ethan Filner, and Jennifer Kloetzel) opened the concert with Schubert’s Quartettsatz in C Minor, D. 703, and closed with the rarely-played “2 Sketches Based on Indian (Native American) Themes, A.99″ by Charles Tomlinson Griffes.

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