Author Archives: Rachel Waldholz, KCAW

Board of Fish adds mop-up to Southeast king troll season

A troller in Sitka's ANB Harbor. The annual troll closure starts at midnight on Saturday. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)The Alaska Board of Fisheries on Monday (3-2-15) took up a pair of proposals to reshape the king salmon troll season in Southeast Alaska. They rejected one, and adopted the other.

At Board of Fish, a preview of pot vs. longline conflict

A proposal before the Board of Fish would have allowed finfish pots like these to be used in parts of the Southeast black cod fishery. (Photo courtesy of Neptune Marine Products)The Alaska Board of Fisheries on Friday took no action on a set of proposals to allow pots in the Southeast black cod fishery. But the debate previewed a larger fight brewing later this spring, over what kind of gear will be allowed across the entire Gulf of Alaska.

Board of Fish leaves herring status quo intact

The seiner Infinite Grace pursing up during the third opening in the Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery, on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)The Board of Fish began deliberations Thursday, the fourth day of their meeting in Sitka. But when it came to one of the most contentious issues, Sitka Sound herring, the Board chose to leave the status quo intact.

Mt. Edgecumbe High School cuts off the table

Sitka’s Mt. Edgecumbe High School has escaped the chopping block -- for now. Lawmakers dropped talk of cuts after hearing it would cost more to educate students in their home districts.

Sitka’s first marijuana law makes it onto the books

Marijuana consumption is now legal in Alaska, but public consumption is prohibited. Sitka's first marijuana ordinance defines what counts as "public." (Photo courtesy of Wikipedia)On Tuesday night, Sitka passed one of the first marijuana ordinances in the state. The ordinance passed on the day that marijuana use became legal in Alaska -- and just hours after the state issued its own emergency regulations.

State budget cuts threaten local jails

Sitka Police Officer Noah Shepard serves coffee to inmates in Sitka's jail, while supervisor Dave Nelson looks on. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)Police departments across the state have been taken aback by a Department of Corrections proposal to end funding for local jails. Sitka is one of several local departments who say the cuts are so deep, it could force their jail to close.

Sitka to increase moorage rates for third year in a row

The new ANB Harbor, at the June, 2014 ribbon-cutting. (KCAW photo/Greta Mart)Rates for both transient and permanent slip holders will go up by 6.68%. The increase is effective immediately for transient users. For resident vessels, it will go into effect on April 15.

No longer in crisis, hospital status still ‘urgent’

Rob Allen was hired as interim CEO at Sitka Community Hospital in January. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)Two months after a financial crisis forced it to request an emergency loan, Sitka Community Hospital has a new CEO, about a million dollars on hand and no plans to ask for more money from the city.

Power outage UPDATE – 3PM THURS FEB 5

Power went out in Sitka at 2:47 p.m. (2-5-15). The Electric Department reports that a tree is down on Green Lake Road, cutting off power throughout Sitka. Linemen are responding now. The city is hoping to restore service within the hour. We'll post more updates as we have them.

At City-Tribe meeting, frank talk on industrial park, transit

The Sitka Assembly and Sitka Tribal Council met on January 30, 2015. From left, Tribal Council member Wilbur Brown, Sitka Community Hospital CEO Rob Allen, Assembly member Aaron Swanson, Assembly member Matt Hunter, City Administrator Mark Gorman, Mayor Mim McConnell, Tribal Council member Bob Sam, Tribal Chair Mike Baines, Assembly member Michelle Putz, Assembly member Steven Eisenbeisz, STA General Manager Lawrence SpottedBird, Assembly member Tristan Guevin, Tribal Council member Harvey Kitka, and Tribal Council member Rachel Moreno. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)The Sitka Assembly and the Sitka Tribal Council met Friday. The twice-a-year dinner is billed as a chance for the city’s two governments to speak freely -- and Friday night’s meeting featured some frank talk.