News

Fiber optic cable suspected in communication outage

quakeMother Nature rattled Northern Southeast this morning (7-25-14) with and magnitude 5.9 earthquake and several dozen aftershocks. The quake appeared to have damaged internet and cell service to thousands of Southeast residents. Service providers suspect damage to an underwater fiber-optic cable, but the cable's owner, Alaska Communications Systems, has not released any information.

Happy campers ride out quake at Shelikov beach

Mamie (l.) and Leone Clare, and their mom, Krisanne Rice, on the Starrigavan boat ramp. At first, Mamie thought the quake might have been a bear shaking the cabin.Most Southeast Alaskans slept through Friday morning’s (7-25-14) magnitude 5.9 earthquake, but there were plenty who didn’t. KCAW’s Robert Woolsey spoke with a few people around the region who were jolted awake in the wee hours by the quake and its many aftershocks -- including some very happy campers.

Bomb team investigates Lance Drive cache

After a Sitka homeowner unearths suspicious wires, local officials call in a military explosives squad to investigate.

Earthquake felt in Southeast Alaska, no tsunami expected

quakeUPDATE 10:47 AM FRI JUL 25, 2014 An early morning earthquake today is causing widespread communications problems in Southeast Alaska. Both Alaska Communications and AT&T wireless and internet services were affected. A recorded message on ACS’s customer services line says the outage is affecting some customers in Southeast. “This is our highest priority and we are working to restore service as quickly as possible,” the message said. ACS spokeswoman Hannah Blankenship says crews are still working to determine which networks were affected by the quake. An AT&T representative could not be reached for comment. Revised figures from the Alaska Earthquake Information Center put the quake’s magnitude at 5.9. It struck about 97 miles west of Juneau at a depth of about 6 miles. It was followed by several aftershocks. The largest was magnitude 5.7.

How many people can the planet hold?

Alan Weisman is one of the faculty at this year's Sitka Symposium. (Photo courtesy of the Island Institute)What would the world look like if every human on the planet suddenly vanished? Alan Weisman set out to answer that question, traveling the globe to find out what would happen if nature were suddenly left to its own devices.

Luis Urrea opens his heart to Sitka

Luis Urrea on the Sheldon Jackson Campus. (KCAW Photo/Greta Mart)Luis Alberto Urrea’s writing was rejected for 10 years before a New York publisher took his first book in 1993. Since then Urrea - currently in town for the Sitka Symposium - has won a slew of prestigious awards, and has been nominated for a Pulitzer Prize.

Sturges finds music in life’s final verses

Molly Sturges leading a Sitka Symposium session. (Photo by Christine Davenport)Composer and artistic director Molly Sturges is one of this year’s faculty at the Sitka Symposium. KCAW interviewed Sturges to learn more about one of her specialities, “sound poetry events.”

Tresham gets to birds before they get to planes

An Alaska Airlines jet touches down in Sitka. Both runway approaches are over ocean. (Flickr photo/Pat Groves)If you find landing at Sitka’s airport to be a little unnerving, you’re not alone. One man is out there worrying with you: Dave Tresham spends 14 hours a day chasing birds from Sitka’s runway and airspace. He spoke to the Sitka Chamber of Commerce this week.

BLM denies SJ Redoubt claim

Sealaska has moved one step closer to owning the land surrounding Sitka’s Reboubt Falls. A ruling this month dismissed a claim to the same land filed by the Sheldon Jackson College trustees. If it stands, the ruling will remove a major obstacle from the decades-long effort to gain Native ownership of the site, home to the area’s largest subsistence sockeye fishery.

Assembly considers vehicle tax to fund roads

Sitka’s car owners may soon see a fee increase. The assembly voted 5 to 1 Tuesday night to raise vehicle registration fees. Money raised through the tax would go towards the city’s roads.