News

Women crush record in soggy ’14 Alpine Adventure Run

140720_Tasha_FolsomOn a day that seemed almost guaranteed to produce no record times, two Sitka women on Saturday (7-19-14) crushed the course record in the 21st Alpine Adventure Run. Tasha Folsom took first place in the women’s event, with a time of 1:18:10 -- a full two minutes faster than the record set last year by New York runner Emily deLaBruyere. Second-place woman Emily Routon also beat last year's record time.

Sitka father, son finish 3,000 mile trans-America run

David Wilcox (l.), Brett Wilcox, Olivia Wilcox, and Kris Wilcox were met by large crowds in Ocean City, NJ, as they wrapped up their 6-month, 3,000 mile run. (RunningTheCountry.com photo)A father-son team from Sitka has completed a six-month run across the United States. Brett and David Wilcox ran into Ocean City, New Jersey, on Saturday (7-19-14), after covering 3,000 miles on foot. The project was intended to raise awareness about the hazards of genetically-modified foods.

Gull-egg harvest gets boost from Congress

Glaucous-winged gulls nest in Glacier Bay. Federal legislation allows Hoonah Tlingits to harvest their eggs.(Courtesy National Park Service.)The measure is one of 16 included in a package of land-use bills recently passed by the United States Senate.

A whale of a tale: Sitka pilot goes viral

Murray's float plane coming in for a landing, and the mist of the whale's breath. (Courtesy of Thomas Hamm/Break.com).A 48-second YouTube video catching the swift reactions of a Sitka float plane pilot went viral this past week. KCAW tracked down the pilot and the man who took the video to bring us the full story of how a routine flight in Southeast Alaska made waves on news programs and websites around the world.

Work on HPR to stretch into September

Work on Sitka’s Halibut Point Road will extend into the fall, several weeks longer than originally planned, after contractors ran into some unexpected obstacles buried within the road bed.

State road projects in Sitka at $70-million and climbing

While Halibut Point Road repaving remains stalled, crews are beginning the $2-million project on Harbor Drive. (KCAW photo/Robert Woolsey)The state has spent nearly $70-million on transportation projects in Sitka over the last five years, and there’s more on the way -- a single-lane gravel road into Katlian Bay. Al Clough, the regional director for the Department of Transportation, recapped the DOT's plans in Sitka for the Chamber of Commerce (7-16-14).

More fish for the taking at Redoubt

Sitka resident and ADF&G biologist Patrick Fowler dipnetting for sockeye at Redoubt in early July, 2014. (KCAW photo/Rebecca LaGuire)As of July 16, subsistence fishermen trekking out to Redoubt Bay can catch up to 25 sockeye salmon at a time, up from a 10-fish limit earlier this summer. Sport fishermen will see possession limits rise to six sockeye, from four.

‘Romeo’ a story of transformation, tragedy

Romeo was fully wild, but social. He often mingled with Juneau dogs. (David Wilson photo)His name was Romeo, and his story is almost as tragic as his Shakespearian namesake’s. Author Nick Jans has just published A Wolf Called Romeo about the black wolf which captivated Juneau residents for seven winters, before being illegally taken by a hunter in 2009. Jans will be in Sitka this Sunday (7-20-14) for a signing at Old Harbor books.

Consultants to help streamline Sitka administration

Unlike most other departments, the city administration has no master plan. (KCAW photo/Robert Woolsey)Municipal Solutions, based in Phoenix, Arizona, was in Sitka last week to meet with city officials. They’ll spend the next few months reviewing operations in city hall from the ground up, and -- hopefully -- identify efficiencies and savings.

The White Elephant at a crossroads

The White Elephant Shop. (KCAW/photo by Greta Mart)There are now a handful of thrift shops and consignment stores in Sitka, but for decades there was only one: The White Elephant. In business for over 50 years, the White E -- as locals call it -- has contributed millions of dollars to support nonprofits, and to assist individuals in need of a helping hand. Until recently, the organization was run exclusively by volunteers