Southeast News

Study: Tongass forest most resistant to climate change

Sport fishermen cast lines at Blind Slough, a Tongass National Forest site near Petersburg. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Some conservationists want President Obama’s climate change agenda to include Southeast Alaska’s rain forest.

Sitka geologically separate from rest of Alaska

Geologist Susan Karl points to faults shown on a new geologic map of Baranof Island, in Southeast Alaska. It reflects the discovery that the island's bedrock is different from that of other parts of the region. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Sitka sits on a different chunk of the Earth’s crust than the rest of Alaska. Decades of scientific research have led to a report and map showing where the faults lie.

Swarm of small quakes hit Yakutat Bay area

Two glaciers flow into Yakutat Bay. Glacial calving causes regular, but small, earthquakes. The Hubbard Glacier, right, sometimes surges, blocking off an arm of the bay. (Photo courtesy Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve)About 30 earthquakes have hit the Yakutat area this week. The swarm is caused by calving glaciers in a nearby bay, not movement of the Earth’s crust.

Damaged hull forces ferry Aurora out of service

The ferry Aurora docks in Gustavus in 2010. It's now in Ketchikan for hull repairs and its annual overhaul. (Photo courtesy Alaska Department of Transportation)The ferry Aurora is in the shipyard a week earlier than scheduled after a crack was found in its hull.

Unified voice needed for federal response to B.C. mines

8-6-15 meeting signLt. Gov. Byron Mallott says the state will share its knowledge and ask for input on Canadian mines near rivers that flow into Alaska.

Tribes to get voice in state transboundary mine work

Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott speaks at a Wednesday tribal meeting in Juneau on transboundary mines. United Tribal Transboundary Mining Work Group Co-Chair Rob Sanderson Jr., center, and Fish and Game Commissioner Sam Cotten, right, listen. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)State government will formally involve tribal groups in its transboundary mining work. Alaska Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott made that commitment Wednesday while meeting in Juneau with Southeast Native leaders.

Feds ask cruise ships, boats to stay far away from seals

Harbor seals rest on ice near South Sawyer Glacier in 2007. New federal guidelines suggest, but don't require, vessels to stay about 500 yards away from the marine mammals to lessen disturbances. (Photo courtesy NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center)Federal officials want cruise ships, tour boats and kayaks to stay far away from harbor seals in Alaska’s glacial fjords.

Southeast cities ask for fewer ferry cuts

The ferry Taku sails into Juneau’s Auke Bay terminal. It’s tied up for the year, affecting Ketchikan seafood processors who transport their fish to Prince Rupert, British Columbia. (Photo by LCGS Russ/Wikimedia Commons)Southeast Alaska community leaders hope to restore some ferry sailings cut due to state budget reductions.

Marine debris barge to skip Southeast

A Coast Guard helicopter lifts one of several bags of marine debris collected in 2014 on Biorka Island, near Sitka. (Photo courtesy Sitka Sound Science Center)The barge picking up marine debris from Alaska's coastline will skip Southeast. Regional communities are sticking with existing disposal agreements.

Landless Natives bill gets first hearing in Congress

U.S. Rep. Don Young poses in his office with Sealaska board member Richard Rinehart, left, and landless spokesman Leo Barlow, right. Barlow and Reinhart were lobbying this week for Young’s landless Natives legislation. (Photo courtest Don Young’s office.)Haines, Petersburg, Wrangell, Ketchikan and Tenakee were left out of 1971’s Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, which gave land, money and corporate status to many other communities. The new bill tries to change that.