Southeast News

Council takes over foster care for region’s Native children

State Health and Social Services Commissioner Valerie Davidson and Tlingit-Haida Central Council President Richard Peterson embrace after signing an agreement transfering foster care and other programs for Southeast Native children to the council. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)The largest tribal government in Southeast Alaska now has authority over foster care and other services for Native children facing abuse or neglect.

Southeast lawmakers split on Walker budget plan

Reps. Cathy Muñoz, center, and Sam Kito, right, listed as Sen. Dennis Egan makes a point. The three Juneau lawmakers make up half of Southeast’s legislative delegation. (Photo by Casey Kelly/KTOO)Southeast Alaska lawmakers are giving Gov. Bill Walker’s spending plan mixed reviews. Some are ready to change the way government is funded, while others are not.

Southeast’s year in review: ferries, logging and mining

Three ferries tied up at the Ketchikan Shipyard in the winter of 2012. Commercial users will likely pay higher rates beginning next winter. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)The year 2015 saw the beginnings of major changes to the Alaska Marine Highway, the Tongass National Forest and the possible future of transboundary mines.

Ferries keep old underage travel rules, for now

0414_marine_highway_brightened_1200x900 kids on ferry - AMHSThe Alaska Marine Highway System is not changing its rules for children traveling solo anytime soon. Rules proposed a year ago have not been implemented.

Alaskans say the ferry system is worth the cost

Students protest cuts in the marine highway system budget at the Kake ferry terminal last March. (Photo courtesy Adam Davis/Sustainable Southeast Partnership)Coastal Alaskans told state officials why the ferry system needs to be maintained during a meeting Friday (10-23-15) afternoon in Sitka.

State cuts could close one Sitka harbor

140708_Crescent_Harbor-KCAW 300x225If budget cuts eliminate a state matching-grant program for marine facilities, Sitka could have to close one of its boat harbors. At least three are scheduled for work over the next 10 years.

Feds: B.C. mines won’t go before international commission

Secretary of State John Kerry arrives in Anchorage Aug. 30. Lt. Gov. Byron Mallott, in suit, and First Lady Donna Walker are among those greeting the secretary. (Photo courtesy Office of Gov. Walker)The U.S. State Department will not propose putting Southeast Alaska’s transboundary mine conflict before the International Joint Commission. That’s the U.S.-Canada panel that addresses cross-border water issues.

New Southeast, Southwest transportation chief named

Mike Coffey takes over as Department of Transportation and Public Facilities Southcoast Region director Oct. 1. (Photo courtesy DOTPF)Mike Coffey, a longtime Department of Transportation manager, will soon be in charge of the agency’s Southeast and Southwest Alaska operations.

Study: Tongass forest most resistant to climate change

Sport fishermen cast lines at Blind Slough, a Tongass National Forest site near Petersburg. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Some conservationists want President Obama’s climate change agenda to include Southeast Alaska’s rain forest.

Sitka geologically separate from rest of Alaska

Geologist Susan Karl points to faults shown on a new geologic map of Baranof Island, in Southeast Alaska. It reflects the discovery that the island's bedrock is different from that of other parts of the region. (Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)Sitka sits on a different chunk of the Earth’s crust than the rest of Alaska. Decades of scientific research have led to a report and map showing where the faults lie.