Tag Archives: herring

ADF&G gears up for herring season with first aerial surveys

The Department conducted its first aerial survey on Tuesday. Biologists spotted predators, including whales and sea lions, but saw no herring and no herring spawn.

Herring Camp connects tradition, science

Tristan Ballesderoz and Kyler Newton label a dissected herring during Knowledge of Herring Camp, on March 21. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)Sitka National Historical Park Ranger Ryan Carpenter describes the unique partnership behind Herring Camp, a spring-break program for middle school students. Herring Camp mixes contemporary scientific methods with traditional knowledge to give students a well-rounded perspective on this critical resource. With Tribal culture-bearer Chuck Miller, resource protection manager Jeff Feldpausch, and camper Madison Roy-Mercer. Downloadable audio.

Board of Fish leaves herring status quo intact

The seiner Infinite Grace pursing up during the third opening in the Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery, on Wednesday, March 26, 2014 (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)The Board of Fish began deliberations Thursday, the fourth day of their meeting in Sitka. But when it came to one of the most contentious issues, Sitka Sound herring, the Board chose to leave the status quo intact.

Board of Fish meeting opens Monday in Sitka

The Alaska State Board of Fisheries opens a ten-day meeting in Sitka this morning (Mon 2-23-15). On the agenda for the board are 107 proposals for changes in management to Southeast Alaska’s herring, salmon, and groundfish fisheries.

At City-Tribe meeting, frank talk on industrial park, transit

The Sitka Assembly and Sitka Tribal Council met on January 30, 2015. From left, Tribal Council member Wilbur Brown, Sitka Community Hospital CEO Rob Allen, Assembly member Aaron Swanson, Assembly member Matt Hunter, City Administrator Mark Gorman, Mayor Mim McConnell, Tribal Council member Bob Sam, Tribal Chair Mike Baines, Assembly member Michelle Putz, Assembly member Steven Eisenbeisz, STA General Manager Lawrence SpottedBird, Assembly member Tristan Guevin, Tribal Council member Harvey Kitka, and Tribal Council member Rachel Moreno. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)The Sitka Assembly and the Sitka Tribal Council met Friday. The twice-a-year dinner is billed as a chance for the city’s two governments to speak freely -- and Friday night’s meeting featured some frank talk.

Hoonah Sound herring-spawn fishery to close for a second year

Herring roe-on-kelp is called Kazunoko Kombu in sushi restaurants. (Flickr photo/Vincent Ma)The herring spawn-on-kelp fishery in Hoonah Sound will remain closed in the 2015 season -- for the second year in a row. The Alaska Department of Fish & Game announced the closure this week (12-2-14) after forecasts for the area predicted herring numbers far below the threshold required for commercial harvest.

Sitka herring forecast lowest in a decade

A seiner purses up as a tender pulls alongside to start pumping herring, during the fourth and final opening in the 2014 Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)The Alaska Department of Fish & Game, which released its preliminary harvest level for the 2015 Sitka Sound sac roe herring fishery. The preliminary harvest level is just over 8,700 tons. That would be the lowest level since 2003. And it’s about half of last year’s target.

Archaeologist: Herring once far more abundant, widespread

Herring caught during the 2014 Sitka Sound sac roe fishery. A recent study suggests that managers should take a longer view when managing fisheries like this one. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)A recent study suggests that current herring populations in Southeast Alaska and British Columbia may be just a remnant of what once existed. Archaeologist Madonna Moss has studied sites in and around Southeast Alaska for decades. She says that evidence indicates that herring were once far more widespread than they are today. And, she says, fishery managers should look to the past when making decisions about the present.

A biologist’s view of herring season

ADF&G biologist Dave Gordon disembarks from a float plane after an aerial survey of Sitka Sound, headed for the state research vessel, the Kestrel. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)Sitka’s commercial herring season ended on Saturday, after fishermen caught over 17,000 tons of herring in just nine days. As it does every year, the fishery brought a fleet of seiners to town, and drew residents to the waterfront to watch the high speed derby unfold in front of them. And at the center of all this action is a team of biologists, whose job is to strike a balance between protecting the resource, and providing access for fishermen.

Learning about herring, inside and out

Sixth graders Abby Saiz and Cora Dow dissect their specimen during Knowledge of Herring Camp, on March 21. (KCAW photo/Rachel Waldholz)This year, the Sitka Tribe, Sitka School District and Sitka National Historical Park launched what they hope become a new March tradition: herring camp. During spring break, about fifteen students, in 5th grade through high school, participated in a week of research into herring biology and ecology, along the way learning a little something about what goes on inside this iconic spring fish.