Adrienne Wilber began beekeeping this year, and so far things have been buzzing along, but a few weeks ago she noticed bees from one of the hives dying off at an alarming rate.
Adrienne Wilber examines one of her three hives. She began beekeeping this year, and so far things have been buzzing along, but a few weeks ago she noticed bees from one of the hives dying off at an alarming rate. (KCAW/Rose)

Adrienne Wilber didn’t get into beekeeping thinking she’d be able to harvest much honey. Sitka’s climate doesn’t produce much liquid gold. But she was excited about the prospect of caring for bees in a day and age when bee populations across the country are in decline.

KCAW’s Katherine Rose spoke with Wilber on the morning interview

Just last month Wilber began to notice bees in one of her hives dying at an alarming rate. She observed many dying with their tongues out, a sign of bee poisoning.

Wilber says she was happy to learn that the city parks and recreation department doesn’t use pesticides. She worries that household pesticides may be to blame, but it’s hard to say where the bees could be exposing themselves, since they can travel around three miles from the hive to forage.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of bees began dying off recently. Wilber believes the bees may have been exposed to unsafe pesticides (KCAW/Rose)