KCAW https://www.kcaw.org Community broadcasting for Sitka and the surrounding area Tue, 23 Jan 2018 21:34:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.2 Tsunami warning for Sitka, coastal Alaska – CANCELLED https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/23/tsunami-warning-sitka-coastal-alaska/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/23/tsunami-warning-sitka-coastal-alaska/#respond Tue, 23 Jan 2018 10:38:27 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60555 UPDATE: 3:30 AM TUE JAN 23 ALL CLEAR! The Local Emergency Operations Center has lifted the tsunami warning for Sitka and surrounding coastal areas. It is now safe to return home to low-lying areas. A tsunami advisory remains in effect for other areas of the coast, specifically from Chignik Bay in the Aleutians to 90 miles east of Seward.]]>

UPDATE: 3:30 AM TUE JAN 23

ALL CLEAR! The Local Emergency Operations Center has lifted the tsunami warning for Sitka and surrounding coastal areas. It is now safe to return home to low-lying areas. A tsunami advisory remains in effect for other areas of the coast, specifically from Chignik Bay in the Aleutians to 90 miles east of Seward.

UPDATE: 3:05 AM TUE JAN 23

TSUNAMI WARNING REMAINS IN EFFECT – The Sitka Emergency Operations Center is advising Sitkans to remain on high ground for the time being. A magnitude 7.9 earthquake 175 miles southeast of Kodiak occured at 12:31 a.m. this morning, prompting widespread tsunami warnings for Alaska, the Washington, Orgegon, and California coasts, Hawaii, and Samoa. Some tsunami activity (receding water, returning water) has been observed in Kodiak harbor, but so far no major wave or inundation has been reported.

ORIGINAL REPORT:

Sitka, and all areas of coastal Alaska, are under a tsunami warning following a magnitude 8.0 earthquake 175 miles south of Kodiak at 12:31 a.m. this morning (1-23-18). EVACUATION CENTERS ARE OPEN at Sitka High School and Keet Gooshi Heen Elementary School. Predicted arrival time, if a tsunami has been generated, is 2:00 a.m. in Sitka and surrounding areas.

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The Board of Fish is dealing with climate change, why isn’t Congress? https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/22/board-fish-dealing-climate-change-isnt-congress/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/22/board-fish-dealing-climate-change-isnt-congress/#respond Tue, 23 Jan 2018 03:51:46 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60547 As Alaska’s Congressional delegation participates in the circus that is going on in Washington, DC, our local leaders in fisheries, tribal entities, and our Alaska Board of Fish are doing the extremely hard work of trying to make policies for sustaining our fisheries in the face of changing climate and ocean conditions.]]>

Opinions expressed in commentary on KCAW are those of the author, and are not necessarily shared by the station’s board, staff, or volunteers.

My name is Andrew Thoms. I am the director of the Sitka Conservation Society.

For more than decade, the community of Sitka has sent clear messages to our Congressional delegation that we are very concerned about the impacts of climate change on our community and our state. Specifically, we have outlined the concerns for our sport, commercial, and subsistence fisheries because of how ocean acidification and warming water temperatures will affect the ocean ecosystems. Over the 12 days in Sitka, the Alaska Board of Fish has had to squarely face what climate change impacts are having on our fisheries. Our Alaska Department of Fish and Game has repeatedly stated that the dire situation that we are seeing in king salmon returns is because of ocean productivity and ocean conditions.

Similarly, the steadily declining guideline harvest for sac-roe herring is cited as a result of low ocean productivity. The list of impacted species continues and includes commercial species like pollock and halibut, feed species like capelin and sand lance, and the indicator species of ocean health that prey on the same species as king salmon which are the common and thick-billed murres that breed on St. Lazaria Island in the Sitka Sound and whose population crashed beginning around the same time king salmon numbers went into steep decline.

Everyone who spends time on the ocean on the west coast was well aware of the warm water blob between 2014 and 2016. This week Alaska meteorologists conclusively determined it is was because of climate change. It is no longer a case of guessing what climate change impacts will be like or debating if it is really happening. This week the Board of Fish has to make very hard decisions that will affect our livelihoods and economy that are caused by climate change’s impact on our ocean. Fisheries policy and management is changing because of climate change.

In regard to the Alaska Congressional delegation: Although Alaskans and Alaska municipalities have raised the warning flags and asked for policy and action, our delegation has not responded in Washington with effective policy. Don Young famously told the Sitka Chamber of Commerce two years ago that climate change is a hoax. Senator Murkowski is chair of the Energy and Natural Resource Committee,which is one of the most powerful policy-making positions in Congress, and has not advanced any significant policy that would mitigate climate change or its impacts on our oceans in Alaska. Senator Sullivan serves on the Commerce, Science, and Transportation Committee and is bearing witness to the United States losing its place as a world leader in technology and innovation as other countries step into the void we leave in renewable energy technologies.

As a community, Sitka didn’t get help from Congress for our huge renewable energy investment in our hydroelectric project that we practically begged Congress for. Instead, our Congressional delegation is leading the state of Alaska further into a Dutch Disease situation where our state is entirely dependent on oil and fossil fuels; they celebrate opening up new drilling areas that will only further impact our ocean ecosystems and impact our fisheries and make our economy a unstable, one-legged stool beholden to oil corporations.

As Alaska’s Congressional delegation participates in and contributes-to the circus that is going on in Washington, DC, our local leaders in fisheries, gear groups, tribal entities, and our Alaska Board of Fish are doing the extremely hard work of trying to make policies for sustaining our fisheries in the face of changing climate and ocean conditions. It is well past time that our Congressional delegation listened to what Alaskans are saying and experiencing here on the front lines of Climate Change and adopt policies to deal with the human causes of climate change and our unhealthy dependence on fossil fuels.

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Board of Fish passes annual black cod limit for sport fishing https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/22/board-fish-passes-annual-black-cod-limit-sport-fishing/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/22/board-fish-passes-annual-black-cod-limit-sport-fishing/#respond Tue, 23 Jan 2018 02:58:19 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60538 The Board of Fish voted to limit the harvest for non-resident sport fishermen to eight sablefish a year throughout the Southeast Alaska area, with a bag limit of four fish per-day.]]>

The Board of Fish voted to limit the harvest for non-resident sport fishermen to eight sablefish a year throughout the Southeast Alaska area. Photo/NOAA Website

The Alaska Board of Fisheries on Monday (1/22/18)  addressed several proposals relating to groundfish in Southeast Alaska, including one that will affect the charter fishing community in Sitka. The Board of Fish voted to limit the harvest for non-resident sport fishermen to eight sablefish a year throughout the Southeast Alaska area, with a bag limit of four fish per-day.

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game was neutral on the proposal and opposed any establishment of annual limits if there weren’t any conservation concerns. They said the proposal would reduce the impact of sport fishing on the sablefish population in Southeast a little over 2 percent. Though the board didn’t say there was urgent need to conserve the population, Board of Fish chairman John Jensen said he would support the measure because it was consistent.

“I think it’s time to make everybody have limits,” Jensen said. “The personal use people have limits. The commercial fishery have limits. Why can’t we just give it to everybody. The stock has been declining for quite some time. I know the department doesn’t have any biological concerns. But the trend is down, so I’m going to support annual limits.”

Israel Payton of Wasilla, who voted against the proposal, said that while he understood the frustrations of commercial fishermen who pay for expensive permits and want to meet 100 percent of their allocation, he didn’t feel comfortable limiting the harvest of a fishery that makes such a small impact on the black cod population, in the interests of commercial fishing.

“Should we let one user that has been getting 100 percent of the pie, should we cap a small user of his incentive to grow,” Payton said. “According to our constitution, that permit does not give you the right to the fish. It gives you the right to access the fish. Under the common use clause we are all in our natural state, these fish and game waters are reserved for all people. So it frustrates me when I hear some of that entitlement, that when you own a permit you own a right to the fish.”

The board voted 4-3 for the proposal, with members Payton, Morisky and Huntington voting against.

 

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School board, assembly discuss 2018’s deficit ‘crunch’ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/19/school-board-assembly-discuss-2018s-deficit-crunch/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/19/school-board-assembly-discuss-2018s-deficit-crunch/#respond Sat, 20 Jan 2018 03:22:02 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60421 The Sitka School Board has opened its 2018 budget-building process over $2.3 million in the hole. The board and the Sitka Assembly met in a work session (1-17-18) to look for ways to make ends meet -- in both the schools and the city -- next year.]]>

Assembly members (l to r) Matt Hunter, Richard Wein, and Steven Eisenbeisz hear the concerns of School Board members (l to r) Jen McNichol, Elias Erickson, Dionne Brady-Howard, and Eric Van Cise. Assembly members Ben Miyasato, Aaron Bean, and Bob Potrzuski also attended. (KCAW photo/Robert Woolsey)

The Sitka School Board has opened its 2018 budget-building process over $2 million in the hole.

The board and the Sitka Assembly met in a work session this week/last week (1-17-18) in the high school library to take a preliminary look at the numbers.

The group expressed real concern about making ends meet — in both the schools and the city — next year.

Downloadable audio.

The Sitka School Board will hold a staff budget hearing at 3:45 p.m. Wednesday, January 31, at Keet Gooshi Heen. The next community budget hearing for schools will be 7 p.m. Wednesday, February 28, in the Sitka High School Library.

The Sitka School District typically opens its budget cycle with a big deficit — even one as large as $2 million. But in the past there has always been a deep pocket to save the day. Once that may have been the federal government’s Secure Rural Schools program — but it’s been gone since 2016. The city in 2015 stepped up with $1 million in cash to cover a district shortfall, but that likely won’t be the case again in the coming year, according to assembly member Steven Eisenbeisz.

“It’s amazing. Your budget looks exactly like ours: cuts from the state, and cuts from outside sources are putting us in this crunch we’re in now.”

The “crunch” is a deficit of $3-4 million in the city’s budget, said Mayor Matt Hunter. Combined with $100 million in deferred maintenance on municipal infrastructure, like the water, sewer, and electrical utilities, the harbors, the police and fire departments, and the city-owned Sitka Community Hospital.

The city does contribute significantly to the schools — $6.1 million, about 30-percent of the district budget. The state picks up most of the rest of the $20 million it takes to run the Sitka school system. So why is the district coming up short?

The problem is that the government contribution to schools is staying flat — or even shrinking — as school enrollment declines (1,244 estimated in Sitka Schools next year, down from 1,253 this year), and expenses are always on the rise. Especially union-negotiated salaries, health insurance premiums, and energy costs.

If the district were to try and make up the deficit in salaries alone, the results would be staggering. Assembly member Bob Potrzuski spent most of his career teaching Social Studies at Sitka High.

“Just doing rough math in my head. To simply cut staff, that would be between 20-30 teachers?”

Although both bodies are elected by the public, the school board doesn’t have any authority to levy taxes. The assembly does, but it’s reluctant to use it without approval from voters. Many communities in the country fund local schools with property taxes. Sitka does the same, at a tax rate of six-tenths of one-percent (.006) — commonly called “6 mils.”

During the era of big oil, Sitka voters amended the city charter and capped their tax rate at 6 mils, so the assembly couldn’t nudge that up even if they wanted to. A Citizen’s Task Force in 2016 reexamined the tax cap and concluded that what was a great idea in 1990 was actually detrimental to budgeting now. But voters that fall wouldn’t budge, nor would they in 2011 or 2010, when half-mil hikes were on the ballot.

School board member Dionne Brady-Howard thought that would be the case again, unless the district and city took steps to educate voters.

“You know I think rather than just waiting until we put up a mill increase before them on the ballot, or a budget cut on our part, that we kind of need to think bigger picture, more proactive, and try to educate more of our electorate about where we really are. Because all people see is: It’s already expensive to live here. Don’t tax me more.”

Not everyone was optimistic about bringing voters up to speed sufficiently to pass a property tax increase. Board member Eric Van Cise thought letting schools suffer would be a deal-breaker for Sitkans who may already be “one check away from catastrophe.”

“What keeps people in this town, and why they work 2 or 3 jobs, is the schools, and also the community.”

Assembly member Bob Potrzuski, however, cautioned that there should be balance.

“Do we get into a situation where the schools are great, but the sewers don’t work? Nobody’s going to want to live in a house where the sewer’s backed up because the city can’t afford to fix the infrastructure.”

Assembly member Richard Wein was also not in the optimists’ camp. He wanted to know what the contingency plan was if the budget gap could not be closed. Potrzuski hinted that the assembly was planning to explore a couple of possible funding measures, but he wouldn’t disclose them. Assembly member Aaron Bean encouraged everyone to revisit the raw fish tax, to see if there wasn’t revenue potential there.

Superintendent Mary Wegner argued for innovation — and for continued investment in the schools. She made a strong point using the combined 13 members of the school board and assembly.

“I look around the table here, there’s eight of you who went through our school system. And here you are making decisions about this community — that is significant. That doesn’t happen everywhere. It is the fact that what we put into every student is going to make a difference to the future of Sitka. Everybody’s in a tight situation — what can we do that’s creative?”

School board president Jen McNichol thanked everyone for their “frank and civil” discussion. “Shockingly, we did not solve any financial issues,” she said, tongue-in-cheek. Nevertheless, she encouraged everyone to continue participating in the many budget meetings ahead.

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Board bans spotter planes, holds off on Chinook conservation plans https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/19/board-bans-spotter-planes-holds-off-chinook-conservation-plans/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/19/board-bans-spotter-planes-holds-off-chinook-conservation-plans/#respond Sat, 20 Jan 2018 03:02:29 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60416 While the Board of Fisheries took action on some salmon issues today (01-19-18), they postponed others until tomorrow. Commercial salmon fishermen are now banned from using spotter planes in Southeast waters.]]>

Salmon fishermen in Southeast are now banned from using spotter planes, as in Prince William Sound. The measure doesn’t affect other fish species such as herring, where spotter planes are common. (Emily Kwong/KCAW photo)

By Emily Kwong, KCAW, and Jacob Resneck, KTOO

While the Board of Fisheries took action on some salmon issues today (01-19-18), they postponed others until tomorrow. Before breaking for the evening, the Board released draft action plans for conserving three king salmon stocks of concern: the Chilkat, King Salmon, and Unuk River.

See those draft action plans here: BoF18_Draft Action Plans

Following a 4-3 vote, commercial salmon fishermen are now banned from using spotter planes in Southeast waters.

Board member Al Cain of Anchorage said it boiled down to an issue of fairness. “We heard one fisherman talking about leveling the playing field, so that the newer or beginning fishermen can compete. Some of those descriptions were very compelling for me,” he said.

Chairman John Jensen of Petersburg didn’t think aircraft made much difference in the age of smartphones. “The thing that’s changed this fishery the most in the last 25 years is the advent of cell phones and track phones,” he said.

Coincidentally, a phone went off in the audience at that moment, generating some chuckles from the audience. “It has nothing to do with pilots. It’s guys on the back deck taking pictures, Facebooking it, YouTube, posting it. Someone in Lisianski can see what they’re doing in Kendrick Bay, 250 miles away. There’s no secrets anymore,” Jensen said.

Spotter planes are already banned in other parts of the state including Prince William Sound. The measure doesn’t affect other fish species such as herring, where spotter planes are common.

The board also took action on the rules for gear groups fishing in Deep Inlet. Each week during the hatchery return of chum salmon, gillnetters had two days to fish while seiners had one. Gillnetters were catching above their allocation. The Board of Fish reversed that ratio. This means seiners will have first dibs on salmon in Deep Inlet for the coming season. 

The board also opened fishing in some Sitka areas to trollers. Trollers can now fish coho after August 20th, when Northern Southeast Regional Aquaculture Association (NSRAA) does cost recovery. The board also established a special harvest area in Crawfish Inlet for the troll fleet to target chum and chinook.

And finally, the Board took some action to conserve chinook salmon. Unattended subsistence nets in Yakutat Bay will now be forbidden in April and May. By doing so, the hope is to eliminate chinooks from being eaten by marine mammals. The board rejected a recommendation from the Yakutat Advisory Committee to close sportfishing around the Situk River weir.

The Board will pick back up at 8 a.m. on Saturday (01-20-17). Raven Radio will Facebook live stream the deliberations.

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Sitka Spruce Celtic Dance to perform ‘Snow White’ this weekend https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/19/sitka-spruce-celtic-dance-perform-snow-white-weekend/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/19/sitka-spruce-celtic-dance-perform-snow-white-weekend/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 19:28:27 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60378 Kris Fulton from Sitka Spruce Celtic Dance will be in to talk about their performance of Snow White at the Sitka Performing Arts Center on Jan. 20 & 21st.]]>

The Sitka Spruce Celtic Dancers study Irish and Scottish dancing, in both traditional and non-traditional forms.

Kris Fulton, Director of Sitka Spruce Celtic Dancers, and performers joined us in the studio to discuss their performance of Snow White at the Sitka Performing Arts Center on Jan. 20 & 21st.

Downloadable Audio

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Crowdsourced weather app relies on ‘human radar’ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/crowdsourced-weather-app-relies-human-radar/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/crowdsourced-weather-app-relies-human-radar/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 04:02:03 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60328 Over the past couple of decades satellites, computers, and remote data collection have made huge advances in weather forecasting possible. But now the National Weather Service is bringing online one of the most sophisticated weather observation tools ever -- regular people.]]>

Hiker Brandie Cheatham puts every inch of her XTRA TUFF boots to the test on the Indian River trail during flooding in Sitka in 2014. Weather fans can now report such events using the mPing app.
(Brian McNitt photo)

After a record-setting weekend, temperatures have dropped to a more normal range in Sitka and elsewhere around Southeast. Sitka topped 60 degrees three times over the MLK Day weekend — Annette Island recorded a high of 65 on January 14.

Over the past couple of decades satellites, computers, and remote data collection have made huge advances in weather forecasting possible. But now the National Weather Service is bringing online one of the most sophisticated weather observation tools ever — regular people.

Downloadable audio.

Of course it’s an app. You can download it for your smartphone from the App Store. Android users can find it at Google Play.

“This app was actually developed initially to help calibrate radars.”

The mPing app is available for iOS devices at the App Store. MPing for Android is available at Google Play.

David Levin is a forecaster with the National Weather Service in Juneau. He says the technology was developed in 2012 at the National Severe Storms Laboratory in Oklahoma.

“When we first came out with what’s called dual-pol radar technology. It allows you to see the shape and the type of precip, as opposed to just how much precip is out there. But they weren’t sure how well it was actually doing, so they developed this app where people can tell you what kind of precip was occuring at their location. Then they could look on the radar and see what was happening and calibrate those precip types that way.”

And so mPing was born. It stands for Meteorological Phenomena Identification Near the Ground. MPing combines the Global Positioning capabilities of your phone — which is the technology behind Google Maps — with old school weather observation. It’s crowdsourced weather data, and Levin says it’s been especially useful in the lower 48 to track the intensity of severe storms. In populated areas, the accumulating pings as people track and report weather start to resemble a kind of human radar.

In Alaska, where low population density is the rule, the mPing app is serving a slightly different role.

“Up here we’ve actually found it useful for some of the areas where we don’t have weather observation equipment. It’s really kind of hard sometimes to tell what’s going on in some of these more remote communities.”

Users can see realtime reports (pings) on a global map. (NOAA image)

Levin says forecasters have realtime access to data from mPing. The pings arrive — in this case — on a big map of Southeast Alaska. And they’re graphic: Snowflakes appear when someone reports snow; raindrops appear for rain. The app has a dropdown menu of the kinds of things you can report — like drizzle or ice pellets — and it also allows you to report storm damage, like uprooted trees.

And Levin says you can also report nothing. As in: Nice weather.

“Believe it or not that’s actually kind of helpful. If we have a forecast out for heavy snow and it’s not actually doing anything — that would be an example where ‘nothing’ would be helpful.”
So whether a lot of people download and use mPing, or whether just a few people use it in places where forecasters have no remote tools, the app will contribute to making better weather forecasts. If I were a betting man, I’d say mPing is going to catch on. People like talking about the weather; now they can ping it right to a screen in front of the weather guy himself.

KCAW – Well, thanks a lot for your time, David. We’ll get something on the air, and I’ll get a link to this on our website so people can download it and start using it.
Levin – Sounds good. We just got a test ping from Sitka. Maybe that was somebody there that was…
KCAW — …Sensing our conversation? It happens!

And so begins what might become the mPing flood.

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Tribe pursues collaborative role at Sitka National Historical Park https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/tribe-pursues-collaborative-role-sitka-national-historical-park/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/tribe-pursues-collaborative-role-sitka-national-historical-park/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 02:01:50 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60309 The National Park Service and Sitka Tribe of Alaska have confirmed that they are in ongoing negotiations to collaboratively provide some services in the park in 2018. ]]>

Sitka National Historical Park is home to the Tlingit fort site Shis’gi Noow and battleground, where the Kiks.adi Tlingit clashed with the Russian American Company in 1804. (Photo/KCAW/Katherine Rose)

Some programs at Sitka National Historical Park may be under tribal management, as early as this summer.

The National Park Service and Sitka Tribe of Alaska (STA) have confirmed they are in ongoing negotiations to collaborate on some services in the park in 2018. Although neither park officials nor Tribal representatives have spelled out the details of the collaboration, it may involve historical interpretation. The park is home to the Tlingit fort site Shís’gi Noow and battleground, where the Kiks.adi Tlingit clashed with the Russian American Company in 1804.

At the STA Tribal Council meeting on Wednesday (01-17-18), the council voted to authorize the Tribal Chair KathyHope Erikson to sign the 2018 funding agreement.

The Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act Amendments of 1994 allows tribal involvement in the management of federal lands. If a tribe has a special historic or cultural relationship with a national park, they can pursue an Annual Funding Agreement (AFA) to provide projects and programs in that park. In 2016, the National Congress of American Indians released a resolution declaring that many national parks fit the bill.

Sitka National Historical Park was on that list, along with Glacier Bay National Park, Denali National Park and Preserve, and many other large national parks across the lower-48.

Conversation between STA and the park service began in 2016, when STA communicated its interest in a funding agreement. They submitted a formal request for negotiations in April of 2017, and have since been meeting regularly to further that process.

A date for signature has not been announced.

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Nighttime trap/skeet shooting opens at Sitka Sportsman’s Assn https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/nighttime-trap-skeet-shooting-opens-sitka-sportsmans-assn/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/nighttime-trap-skeet-shooting-opens-sitka-sportsmans-assn/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 01:30:30 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60323 Steve Ramp, with the Sitka Sportsman's Association, and range manager Stan Johnson discuss the state-of-the-art LED lighting system that makes nighttime trap/skeet shooting possible.]]>

Steve Ramp has done a lot of shooting at the Sportsman’s Association trap range — in daylight. But he’s impressed with the lights. “It was striking how clear it is. You can actually see the steel shot column flying through the air as it hits the bird.” (SSA photo)

Steve Ramp, with the Sitka Sportsman’s Association, and range manager Stan Johnson discuss the state-of-the-art LED lighting system that makes nighttime trap/skeet shooting possible. Also coming up at the SSA: Indoor Pistol League.

Downloadable audio.

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Josh Nelson to headline this year’s Sitka JazzFest https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/josh-nelson-headline-years-sitka-jazzfest/ https://www.kcaw.org/2018/01/18/josh-nelson-headline-years-sitka-jazzfest/#respond Fri, 19 Jan 2018 01:09:35 +0000 https://www.kcaw.org/?p=60315 Sitka JazzFest director Mike Kernin is always looking for new talent to expose music students in Southeast Alaska to, but sometimes he wants to go with a returning pro.]]>

Sitka JazzFest director Mike Kernin is always looking for new talent to expose music students to in Southeast Alaska, but sometimes he wants to go with a returning pro. Pianist Josh Nelson has performed in Sitka before, and he’ll be headlining the upcoming Sitka JazzFest February 1-3, 2018 at the Sitka Performing Arts Center. Tickets go on sale January 19 at Old Harbor Books.

Downloadable Audio.

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